title

TRANSMISSION.04

Exhibited ARTISTS

Joseph Kosuth | Rirkrit Tiravanija | Anna Longo | Elena Rottigni | Gabriele Mazzariol | Giuliana Racco | Jacopo Jarach | Katerina Dolejsova | Katia Meneghini | Lucia Maggio | Marian Vanzetto | Roberto Mainardi | Sabine Jallow | Stefania De Vincentis | Thanos Zakopoulos | Veronica Voltolina Ana Maria Bresciani | Andrés Aguirre | Annapaola Passarini | Enrica Cavarzan | Fabio Marullo | Gastón Ramirez Feltrin | Irene Calderoni | Lucilla Pesce | Marco Baravalle | Mariagiovanna Nuzzi | Nikola Uzunovsky | Silvia Ferri | Sara D’Agostino | Vittoria Martini Assistants: Fiona Biggiero, Francesca Grassi

location

Bassano del Grappa, Venice (Italy).

partners

City councils of Bassano del Grappa, IUAV University of Venice, Bevilacqua La Masa Foundation, Diesel S.p.a., Il Gazzettino, Il Giornale di Vicenza, Radio Cooperativa.

Catalogue // WORKOUT Special Edition

Date
Category
curatorial projects
About This Project

TRANSMISSION.04 was the first part of three, of a public art exhibition conceived and curated by progettozero+ in collaboration with Angela Vettese.

Artists Joseph Kosuth and Rirkrit Tiravanija with their students from IUAV University (Venice) were asked to realize interventions and actions as interferences within the media (newspapers, magazines, radio) and in everyday life contexts.

KJOSK! was the hub of the whole exhibition: a former newsstand renovated and placed in the old town of Bassano del Grappa (IT) hosted events, performances, film screenings, concerts, public art interventions during the whole exhibition.

A special edition of the multilingual European magazine WORK|OUT (Berlin, Paris, Milan, Venice, Genoa, Bologna, Rome) was published. Entitled TRANSMISSION, it was distributed during the opening days of the Venice Biennale of Architecture.
A space for interviews, interventions, live music and encounters was available within the programming of Radio Cooperativa.

Two local newspapers hosted artists’ interventions within their pages.

10 monitors with artists’ videos were placed inside shops windows and in some public offices.